Air Conditioning Service For Miami & Greater Dade County Area

Call us Today!  305-912-COOL (2665)

Air Conditioning Service For Miami & Greater Dade County Area

Call us Today!  305-912-COOL (2665)

Frequently Asked Questions

Q. What does HVAC stand for?

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning.

HVAC Industry Glossary of Terms

HVAC(R): Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning an R may be added to represent Refrigeration.
Split system: Refrigeration system where the refrigerant is piped from one part to another, such as residential heat pump or a/c system.
Packaged or self-contained: Refrigeration system where everything including the air moving hardware is kept in one box, such as a window air conditioner or a roof-top unit.
Forced air: heating and or cooling system that connects to the conditioned space with duct-work that uses air as the moving fluid. The heating or cooling can come from any number of sources.
Radiant: System that uses hot surfaces to radiate or convect heat into the environment. Without the use of fans or blowers
Heat Pump: Refrigeration device that can be used to move heat to or from air or water, or to or from air to water then the water is used to heat or cool air. In some parts of the world they are also known as “Reverse Cycle”.
Evaporator: The part of a refrigeration system that gets cold. It is called the evaporator because it is the part of the system that evaporates the refrigerant from liquid to vapor.
Condenser: The part of a refrigeration system that gives up heat from the refrigerant and changes the refrigerant from a vapor to a liquid. Condensers can be either water cooled or air cooled.
Compressor: The heart of any refrigeration system that pumps the refrigerant.
(absorption systems that use ammonia or lithium bromide do not have compressors). Compressors can be reciprocating, rotary, scroll, disc, or screw.
Receiver: Tank on the liquid side of a system that holds excess refrigerant in the system that needs to be there for proper operation.
Accumulator: Tank on the suction side of a system that holds excess refrigerant to prevent slugging the compressor with liquid.
Outdoor coil: The coil on a heat pump system that is located out side or in the ground loop of a ground sourced heat pump. This is so not to be confused with the condenser on an airconditioning system.
Indoor coil: The coil on a heat pump that is located inside. This is so not to be confused with the evaporator on an air conditioning system.

Q. What regular maintenance do heating and air conditioning systems need?

The most important part of HVAC maintenance aspect is maintaining unrestricted air flows. Dust, dirt, and debris are an HVAC system’s worst enemies. Whether it’s an indoor or outdoor unit, you must keep all filters clean and heat exchangers and coils free of restrictions.

We recommend that your heating and cooling system be checked and serviced twice a year; ideally a spring and autumn tune-up. Also we recommend that you change your filter regularly, depending on the type of filter you have. This alone can eliminate many of the most common problems that need fixing and can significantly reduce the likelihood of a serious breakdown. A Get Mo Cool Comfort Care Club is your assurance that these maintenance needs are met regularly and that any potential problems are promptly identified.

Q. Why do I need to change my filter regularly?

Regular filter replacement helps your heating and cooling system operate at peak levels and improves indoor air quality. It is important to change filters regularly to ensure proper air flow and to keep your home free from dust, allergens and germs. Depending on the type of filter you have, you may require weekly or monthly filter replacements. Your Get Mo Cool service or installation technician will recommend the ideal filters and replacement schedules for your unit(s)

Q. How often should I replace my filters?

In general, Get Mo Cool recommends that you replace your disposable filters at least once a month. If you have washable filters, they should be cleaned once a month. Your Get Mo Cool service technician will recommend a replacement schedule that delivers the optimum efficiency and filtration for your specific system. With a Get Mo Cool Comfort Care Club Plan, we clean and inspect your HVAC system twice each year. Part of the service includes changing the filters or servicing your filtering system. Unless you have special circumstances, our service should be adequate. We recommend that you visually check filters and filtering equipment monthly. If filters look dirty, they need to be cleaned or replaced.

Q. In addition to changing my filters, what maintenance should I do on my heater and/or air conditioner?

Most maintenance should be performed only by a qualified service technician. But here are some things that you can do to assure optimal performance:

  • Keep ground mounted outdoor units clear of debris, clutter and weeds; they can reduce the airflow to the unit.
  • Use caution with weed trimmers around the unit to prevent damaging control wiring.
  • Keep pets away from the unit; pet urine can cause expensive damage.
Q. How often should I have maintenance done on my air conditioner?

You should have maintenance done on your air conditioning system at least once a year – spring to early summer being the best times. This not only ensures maximum efficiency, it enables us to foresee any possible problems that may occur in the near future.

Q. Is there anything I should check prior to calling for service?

Check to be sure that the air conditioner is turned on. Check that the breakers and the disconnects are turned on and be sure the thermostat is set correctly. Also make a note of any strange noises or smells.

Q. How do I know if my system is working properly?

Is it making strange noises? Is it cooling or heating all areas of your home sufficiently? Has it been taking longer to cool down or heat up? Have your utility bills been rising for no apparent reason? Any of these are signs that you may have a problem that needs service. In most cases, the longer you delay, the worse any underlying problems will get. So be sure to contact Get Mo Cool to check out your system whenever you notice anything out of the ordinary.

Q. How are the sizing capacities of heating and cooling systems measured?

Heating and cooling systems sizing is based on B.T.U.H. (British Thermal Units Per Hour). Air Conditioning and Heat Pumps are also rated in tonnage. 12,000 BTUH equals one (1) ton. Residential systems can range from 1 to 5 tons.

Q. How important is it to get the right size of heating and cooling equipment?

Sizing HVAC equipment is very important from the standpoints of both comfort and energy use. Heating and cooling equipment that are over-capacity will not run as frequently or as long when it does run. In both cases, this may mean poor humidity control. It could also result in temperature variations or noticeable cycling. Over-capacity equipment will not be as energy efficient as properly matched capacity either. On the other hand, equipment that is under-sized, will obviously result in loss of comfort during temperature extremes.

Q. What size HVAC system should I have?

Unfortunately, there’s no simple rule of thumb for determining the ideal size of system for each home. For example, depending upon the construction of your home, one (1) ton of air conditioning can cool anywhere from 300 to 800 square feet of home. The only way to insure the size of the system you purchase will be large enough to heat or cool your home, but not any larger than you need, is to have your home’s individual heating and cooling needs evaluated by a licensed professional. A Get Mo Cool Comfort Estimator will perform a FREE detailed In-Home Energy Analysis to determine a selection of systems that will work best for your home’s needs and your budget.

Q. Is a system with more capacity better?

No. A larger heating system with more capacity delivers less comfort and costs more to operate. An air conditioner is at its least efficient when it is first turned on. A system with too much capacity will run in numerous short cycles, turning on and off repeatedly, therefore causing it to be less efficient. Also keep in mind that an air conditioner only removes humidity when it’s running, so a system with shorter run cycles doesn’t remove humidity from the air very well.

Q. How do I know if my A/C unit is big enough?

Bigger isn’t always better; its performance and efficiency that count. Before purchasing a replacement system you should always make sure your system is sized properly to match your needs and budget. Your Get Mo Cool Comfort Specialist will thoroughly assess your home and comfort requirements to determine the proper size and make the appropriate recommendation.

Q. How is the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment measured?

When purchasing a furnace, heat pump or air conditioner, ALWAYS ask about its Efficiency Ratings. They will tell you will tell you how efficiently the unit uses fuel (gas, oil or electricity). The most-frequently used efficiency ratings are:

  • SEER (Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio): This ratio tells you the amount of cooling your system will deliver per dollar spent on electricity The SEER rating of any unit can range anywhere from 13 to 17. The higher the SEER the more efficient the system will be and the less it will cost in the long run to own and operate.
  • HSPF (Heating Seasonal Performance Factor): Similar to SEER, it is a measurement of efficiency of the heating portion of a heat pump. HSPF ratings range from 6.8 to 10; high-efficiency units have efficiencies of 7.5 HSPF or above.
  • AFUE (Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency ratio): A measurement of the percent of heat produced by a furnace for every dollar of fuel consumed. The higher the AFUE rating, the lower the fuel costs. All furnaces manufactured today must meet at least 78%. Older furnaces (10 – 15 years or older) may fall below this minimum. Furnaces with AFUE ratings from 78% to 80% are considered mid-efficiency; ones with AFUE ratings above 90% are considered high-efficiency.
  • MERV (Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value): A filter rating system relating to the size of the holes in the filter that allow air to pass through. The higher the MERV rating, the smaller the holes and the higher the efficiency in capturing contaminants. MERV rating range from a low of 1 to a high of 16.
  • ENERGY STAR: An Environmental Protection Agency designation attached to HVAC products that meet or exceed guidelines for high-efficiency performance above the standard government minimums.
Q. How can I increase the efficiency and life of my home’s heating and cooling systems?

A few quick tips:

  • Clean and replace your filters frequently.
  • Your system will heat and cool more evenly when the blower is in the “on” position. The blower provides constant air movement throughout the home, and allows for better filtration.
  • Install shades, drapes, shutters, or screens on windows that are exposed to extreme sunlight to keep room temperatures at moderate levels.
Q. Should I close the registers and doors to areas of the home that I do not use on a regular basis?

No. Every system is designed to cool a certain number of square feet. By closing registers and doors in certain rooms, you disrupt and decrease the systems’ airflow and efficiency. Your system will have to work harder to cool less space, making it cycle more and become less efficient.

Q. How long should my air conditioning system run in a cycle?

There is no exact answer for how long your system should run during each cycle. The average air conditioner is sized to remove the heat from your home as fast as it comes in. Therefore, ideally, on a 100° day the system should be able to keep up with the incoming heat, but not gain on it and not be able to turn off. The cooler it is below 100°, the more the system will cycle on and off. So it depends on the environment of each individual home and the condition of the equipment.

Q. Should I try to keep my air conditioning system from running too much?

Generally speaking, a unit that is either on or off is less expensive than one that keeps cycling on and off repeatedly. Every time your system starts up, it will use a lot of electricity and not produce much cooling. That’s why a smaller system is often more economical to operate: even though it runs nonstop and may deliver less comfort, it will usually consume less power than a larger system that cycles on and off.

Q. What air temperature should my air conditioner produce?

The air temperature produced by your system depends on the temperature of the air going into it. Generally, the air produced should be 15°-20° below what enters the system. So if the entering return air is 80°, the exiting supply air should be about 60°-65°. However, that only works on a system that is operating properly and has been running at least 15 minutes on a warm, dry day with a home that is about 80° inside. On a milder day, with an indoor temperature 70, the air coming out should be 50-55.

Q. At what temperature should I set my thermostat?

Temperature settings depend on the time of year and your personal preferences. In the summer, the average temperature setting is 75°-80°. In the winter 68°-72° is the norm. Remember, when leaving your house; try to avoid drastic temperature changes. Do not set your temperature back more than 5°; this will cause your unit to work harder to achieve the desired temperature setting.

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1674 Meridian Ave. Suite 320
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(305) 912-COOL (2665)
(888) 381-9022

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1674 Meridian Ave. Suite 320
Miami Beach, FL 33139
(305) 912-COOL (2665)

License # CAC1818497

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